Waste-to-Energy in a Dairy Farm

The farm is now turning the extra manure into fuel for its delivery trucks, powering 42 tractor-trailers that make daily runs to raw milk processing plants in Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee.

Eideard

Here at one of the largest dairy farms in the country, electricity generated using an endless supply of manure runs the equipment to milk around 30,000 cows three times a day.

For years, the farm has used livestock waste to create enough natural gas to power 10 barns, a cheese factory, a cafe, a gift shop and a maze of child-friendly exhibits about the world of dairy, including a 3D movie theater.

All that, and Fair Oaks Farms was still using only about half of the five million pounds of cow manure it vacuumed up from its barn floors on a daily basis. It burned off the excess methane, wasted energy sacrificed to the sky.

But not anymore.

The farm is now turning the extra manure into fuel for its delivery trucks, powering 42 tractor-trailers that make daily runs to raw milk processing plants in Indiana, Kentucky and Tennessee. Officials…

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Basics of Biogas Technology

All the nine users of the flexible balloon digesters appreciate the technology because of the various advantages it has over using firewood. However, more efforts need to be geared at educating and sensitizing the masses about biogas technology and how to adapt to maintenance demands of the system.

Urban Batch Anaerobic Biodigester

Open Biotecture

In recent days, the Open Biotecture team has been working to develop a portable bio-digester for urban area.

There is an increasing demand for organic waste management in Kathmandu, and some residents have asked us about cost-effective solutions. Currently, the residents of Kathmandu dispose their organic waste in the streets or pay for door-to-door waste collection services. For the latter, the monthly cost ranges anywhere between 200-500 NPR.

Is Portable Anaerobic Bio-digester a good idea?

Open Biotecture investigated existing solutions for treating organic waste in urban areas. The first consideration was given to aerobic composting, however, the process only produces fertiliser as an output. Also, prejudice regarding bad smells emanating from compost bins was considered a strong disincentive to make composting a valued solution.

Instead, we looked at the possibility of creating portable anaerobic biodigesters to process the waste while producing a certain amount of biogas. To simplify the process…

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Biogas Initiatives in Bangladesh

Bangladesh Economy

By Dr Aynal Haque

RAJSHAHI, June 10 (BSS)- Low-cost biogas, an alternative fuel for cooking, is increasingly getting popular among the people at different rural areas even in outskirts of the metropolis for the last couple of years.

Biogas is not only used as fuel for cooking foods but the slurry, main effluent of the biogas plant, is also being used as organic fertiliser in the farming fields for boosting its production and in the ponds as fish meal.

The people, who never thought of having gas for cooking rice in their remote areas, are now regularly using for their domestic purposes like civic life. Currently, more than 400 rural families are using biogas instead of firewood to cook foods and to boost farm and fish production.

The Premtaly and some of its adjacent localities under Godagari Upazila has been identified as biogas village, local sources said.

Most of the…

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Energy from Food Wastes

Jay F. Nelson

Animal waste may become our next source of green energy.

Private corporations in the U.K. have begun investing big bucks to convert leftover food and animal byproducts into a new source of green energy that produces electricity and cuts costs.

Marketplace BBC World Service recently reported that big U.K. chains such as Walmart and Tesco are now actively running some of their stores on electricity converted from leftover foods.

Fish heads, old lamb chops, stale sandwiches, and chicken fat represent just a few of the food waste products whose biogas can be burned to create electricity.

How do you get electricity from stale sandwiches?

Basically speaking, large vats of rotting organic waste ferment in the absence of oxygen in a kind of biogenic bath. Fermentation produces biogases, such as methane, which can be burned to run the machinery that generates green electricity. Anyone who’s kept a compost pile knows that…

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About Data Centers and Biogas

Gigaom

At first glance biogas — gas that is produced by the breakdown of organic matter — and data centers that are powering the world’s always-on websites don’t seem like a clear fit. The first is an industry in the U.S. in its infancy, and the second is undergoing a rapidly exploding construction boom.

But an increasing number of Internet companies are experimenting with turning to biogas as an emerging source to power part of their data centers. Why? Well, for quite a few reasons. Here’s what you need to know about this emerging phenomenon of biogas and data centers:

1). Where does biogas come from?: Biogas is created when organic matter is broken down in an anaerobic digester and the gas is captured. An anaerobic digestor is a closed tank that doesn’t let any oxygen in, and enables anaerobic bacteria to digest the organic material at a nice, warm…

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Hydrogen from Organic Waste

Clean Energy Diary

It is clear substituting fossil fuels with Hydrogen is not only efficient but also sustainable in the long run. While efforts are on to produce Hydrogen at a cost in par with Gasoline or less using various methods, sustainability is equally important. We have necessary technology to convert piped natural gas to Hydrogen to generate electricity on site to power our homes and fuel our cars using Fuelcell.But this will not be a sustainable solution because we can no longer depend on piped natural gas because its availability is limited; and it is also a potent greenhouse gas. The biogas or land fill gas has the same composition as that of a natural gas except the Methane content is lower than piped natural gas. The natural gas is produced by Nature and comes out along with number of impurities such as Carbon dioxide, moisture and Hydrogen sulfide etc.The impure…

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Denver zoo test-drives elephant-poop-powered vehicle

Grist

The Denver Zoo has to deal with a lot of waste. A good deal of that waste comes from visitors, but the zoo also produces hundreds of thousands of pounds of animal poo each year. Now, zoo engineers have found a positive use for it: They rigged up a poo-powered tuk-tuk. (A tuk-tuk is a motorized rickshaw.)

“We want to show people that we’re not crazy for wanting to take elephant poop and turn it into energy,” one engineer told the Denver Post.

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Biogas from Household Waste

Digital Journo

Today’s Urban Jungle column in The Hindu highlights the potential of using vegetable waste from municipal garbage to run biogas plants at the level of individual houses and beyond. Read the column here. A related story that appeared in Engadget a couple of years ago is here, but the biogas idea now seems more attractive than ever. The Union Budget has indicated that subsidies from the Centre for LPG and other fuels for the majority of consumers (editorial in The Mint here) will be withdrawn.

The piece also touches upon the lack of incentive for Ramky Enviro Engineers, which now has a contract with the Corporation of Chennai to collect and transfer municipal solid waste in three zones, to do the same. Ramky is empowered to sell recyclable waste and transfer the rest to the dumping grounds.

Most interestingly, one of the biogas models discussed in the…

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